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Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
2. both he and john paul ii saw their papacies an attempt to interpret vatican too properly. not so much a modernization of the church, vatican ii was an evangelical missionary council. to some degree modernizing to make the church a more apt meaning to that. hence the wide travel for example of john paul ii, hence the great teaching of benedict xvi. i think that's his major legacy. >> they're very different at least in their style and in their i guess pastor abilities in some way, although not very different philosophically. >> this has been a really unsuccessful papacy and the greatest single act of his papacy is that our church is in real trouble and i am not able to cope with the trouble that we're in. i think there are some of the cardinals that are hoping that the next pope that they elect will convene a vatican 3, something that will set the church on a new course, reach out to the modern world, instead of what has happened under john paul ii as well in terms of the theology and benedict which has been a look backwards in terms of what the theology means, what the role of the
benedict who stepped in and became pope after pope john paul ii, the iconic pope of the 20th century, stepped down. of course, pope john paul ii had been pope since 1979. and so, of course, his impact felt not only in the religious world but also the political world. pope benedict, though, never really, of course, given the chance to emerge from the shadows. and it seems that for a good bit of his time, he was dogged by allegations that came through the child abuse scandal throughout certainly before his reign. he was constantly being dogged by questions regarding that. but mark halperin, an iconic figure replaced by pope benedict who has had a very short tenure and now is stepping down in a way that a lot of popes don't step down before they die. >> short tenure, and it's going to be scrutinized for some of the issues you raised. to me now thinking forward, it's going to be a very big story for catholics and others around the world including the question of will it be another european? there's going to be pressure to look to another region of the country as there was last time. i th
-perpetuating leadership. virtually all these cardinals who are picked either by pope benedict or by pope john paul, i believe, somebody correct me if i'm wrong, the average age is somewhere in the 70s, low 70s. there aren't if to really drive your metaphor into the ground, a lot of blue state sort of cardinals in that list, and so there are not a lot of obviously progressive candidates on the list of potential popes. i don't think progressive conservative, however, is the right optic. i think the real question is when you get someone elected who actually is open to change and dialogue on some of these issues, on the all male celibate priesthood, if not on women priests. birth control is kind of a separate issue. the church ares until this contraception fight over the obama plan, really hasn't preached very much about it. it's not only the faithful who let it go. it's really the church itself who sort of accept that. there just aren't a lot of catholic families of 12 kids anymore in most of the west, and increasingly, not in the third world either. >> e.j., i want to bring in our panel here in new yor
who will be voting were appointed either by john paul ii or benedict xvi and on the big picture issues they are all of one mind. i think it's quite unlikely the next pope is going to ordain women or repeal church teaching on abortion or gay marriage or those kinds of issues. now on the other hand, i would certainly say from my own experience of talking to cardinals the more thoughtful among them realize the church has a woman's problem. they understand there are a lot of sisters who feel the same way as our guest does and it's not just nuns, lots of women generally feel that way. i think the next pope will face this difficult challenge of trying to reach out to women and assuring them there's a place for them in the church while at the same time drawing a line in the sand on the ordinary nation question. >> when you say that they're going to select the new pope and they're going to think outside the box and they're maybe going to south america or africa to choose the next pope, they're really not thinking outside the box though, are they? maybe they are in picking a pope from another c
choosing a quieter life. so very different from his predecessor john paul who stayed until the very end. anthony from pennsylvania witnessed both pope's last sermons. >> they're courage in different ways. in opposite ways but the same degree of courage. >> reporter: the pope summoning the strength to say good-bye, giving up one of the most powerful roles on earth. meeting publicly with the faithful one last time. >> savannah as the pope got up to leave. there was a wave of emotion. people calling out to him, waving good-bye. many people held up banners saying thank you in return. pope benedict told the faithful i have never felt this way. >> thank you. greg burke is the senior communications adviser just with the pope in the final audience. good morning it's good to see you. >> good morning. >> sometimes tone can be lost in translation. you heard this address. how does the pope seem to you these last few days? what's his mood? . he's a serene person. i have known him as cardinal ratzinger. he took a lot of hits from john paul ii. i see him now calmer than ever. he showed a little emotio
the last pope, one that we knew growing up, pope john paul ii, literally allowed the world to watch him die. that was part of the process of sharing life, willie. >> yeah. this pope says he's old and fragile, unable to travel, but you make a good point about the previous pope. john, we've heard many times now that the next pope, whoever that may be, will have to confront the sexual abuse scandal, puts it mildly. that has consumed the roman catholic church for so long. what will that mean exactly? what will a pope do? a new pope in terms of confronting that? will he come out immediately in an opening address? will he purge some of the priests? what do you think that pope will do at least from a public relations point of view to change the perception? >> well, it's the perception and the reality. it's the most disturbing thing about any self-protecting institution. you see this as the catholic chump has, for decade upon decade now, put its own institutional survival and its own institutional dignity, really, ahead of the interests of the weakest people in its care, its children. i think many
of state john kerry. paul ryan is the first republican in the ratings, then marco rubio, jeb bush and speaker boehner. is it a taste of things to come if hillary runs in 2016? >> lefty blogs may be upset at steve doocy. i've seen other things on lefty blogs. i heard that steve doocy actually has calf implants. n now, i don't have any evidence to back that up whatsoever. >> no. >> but, you know, just put a question mark at that. can we put a question mark at the end of that? >> you're referring to, of course, his own personal blog being implanted -- >> sam thought about getting calf implants because we're on a basketball team together. >> that's why he only does television from the waist up. >> exactly. >> just kind of a vanity thing. >> there is a nugget of probably something actually worth discussing here, which is our national obsession with hillary clinton and also the way women are scrutinized in the public lens. >> oh, totally. totally. >> and hillary, in particular, is an incredible sort of sign post for what we'll call the male gaze, given the scrutiny of the way she looks
was very much like a battlefield, it's made a huge difference. in east philly john paul jones middle school had a reputation. >> police used to come to this school. used to be on lockdown. >> fight like these captured from a cell phone from the nearby middle school were common here, too. mold, fleas and rats ravaged the library so badly school officials had to throw away thousands of books. >> when i first came, i was pretty nervous. i thought it was going to be a little scary. >> the nickname came before the bars on the windows and doors. jones jail. >> but last september eighth grader tre'von williams says something happened. >> this became a whole new school. >> school district officials turned it into a charter school, gave it a new name and facelift and then called in the military. >> we needed to have people who are good role models, who believe in education and believe in youth development, and people that had a commitment really to america, and who else but veterans? >> i enlisted when i was 17. my parents signed for me. >> patrick's father is a vietnam vet and a purple heart recipi
, and he looks frail, looks old, but he seemed to be enjoying himself. john paul ii is very much a more engaging pope and not as much as a private man as benedict xvi is. he will leave here tomorrow around this time, by helicopter, and he will go to castle gandolpho and come back to the vatican in his retirement. he'll go into isolation, he's chosen that for himself. the vatican garden cottage as it were, it's not particularly comfortable, i'm told, i haven't been in, but it is somewhere he can spend his twilight years as it were, and he's 85 years old, let's remember that, in peace and reflecting on where he is, who he is, and how far he's come. today was very much an occasion of reflection for the 100,000 or so people who were here, brooke. it was absolutely amazing. we were up there, right at vatican city there and it was a sense of quiet, even though there are over 100,000 people there, so i say, a time of reflection and peace for so many of the faith. brooke? >> and history being made and now less than 24 hours from now, where you are in rome, becky anderson, my thanks to you. >>>
was standing in precisely the same place back in 2005, eight years ago when pope john paul ii died and we went into the conclave which finally produced pope benedict xvi. that took a week and several false starts. when they can't come to a consensus you have the black smoke emanating from that special chimney in st. peter's and then finally the white smoke and then you don't even know who it is until the archbishop deacon cardinals deacon comes to the window and announces a new pope and only after that the new pope comes to the within to and is greeted. but that was still at least two weeks away. at least tweaks away from that being finalized. >> is the italian media still all over the scandals that are going on involving sex and intrigue, all that stuff that we've seen in those rome newspapers over the past few days, or have they moved on? >> well, they pretty much moved on. that of course was a big story over the weekend and into monday, the beginning of this week. as you can imagine it drove the vatican mad. they were really angry, angry with the press for writing about it, angry for people
view her favorable. president obama second at 51%. paul ryan, marco rubio, john boehner, all far behind. joining me now karen tumulte and david goodfriend. thank you for joining me. the analysis of the seven-point dive there, if that's the accurate word here, why do you believe the approval rating is sinking from december? >> a couple of things. in december, we just come off the large presidential election where both he and his republican opponents spent inordinate amounts of money to get the point across and people weigh the two messages. mitt romney versus barack obama and now left with sort of a generic feeling of the public how do you think things are going? as you put on the screen, most americans don't feel things are going well and will blame that on an incumbent. that having been said, the president's approval ratings are still strong as you point out, strong relative to congress and historical trends. i happen to think that the biggest news out of that poll is even after the republicans tried to tar her with benghazi, hillary clinton remains unbelievably strong and i think that
in order here. that the next leader of the catholic church has something of john the xxiii in him and the birth of paul vi and the role of women in the churnl. lots needs to be done. god bless our next pope. god bless the decision on how to pick him. and that's "hardball" for now. thanks for being with us. "politics nation" with al sharpton starts right now. >> thanks, chris: and thanks to you for tuning in. >>> tonight's lead, republicans pass the buck. on this case, 85 billion bucks. with just one day to go until massive spending cuts kick in, republicans have a new idea and it's a doozie. they never wanted a balanced approach that the president wanted. some cuts, some revenues increases, nope, they want just cut, cut, cut. so, today, they decided their new plan would be make the president decide which programs get axed. now, why would they want to make the president wield the ax? well, maybe they've turned on their local news in their home districts to see that the country is furious about the cuts. >> senior action runs meals on wheels ain hastings and provide a hot meal to 80
obama, vice president biden, congressman paul ryan, senator marco rubio and new secretary of state john kerry. she comes out at a 61% approval rating. her husband, bill clinton, who played a big part at getting president obama re-elected is speaking at a keynote conference in leesburg, virginia. joe, it's great to see you. first off, your reaction to those polls there and seeing hillary clinton at the top 61%. any surprise to you? >> no, i don't think there's a surprise at all. i think she was an admired figure before she went to the state department and it only built upon that. i wouldn't make too much from the differential between her and president obama either. when you're in office and you're fighting every day, and the fights are partisan, you know, then 30, 40% of the country is not going to be admiring of you on any given day. i think there's something, too -- the same thing happened with her husband when he left office. you know, his numbers grat you'dly went up and i think it's a recognition of what she's done over her whole career. >> right now it's a one-way street with this
. this is what paul clement is arguing. >> bill: what john boehner argues. you don't need any special rights. you don't need any help or you don't need any particular support. >> listen, i've been called special since i was a small child. i'm not going to tell you what that meant. but i'll take the special rights. [ laughter ] >> bill: i love your comments on this, 1-866-55-press. you know, on public policy issues, we've learned it always takes a long time, you know, to get to the right place. but i must -- it has taken a long time on same-sex marriage. but in the last 12 months, maybe, right it has moved so fast. i think it just has my head spinning. in the right direction. i think it is great. for the president of the united states last year to come out in support of same-sex marriage. now for this big group of republicans to do so. and it was only ten years ago or less that republicans were using this as a -- against every liberal, every democrat in the country. >> absolutely. if you need any evidence of discrimination right, it was those -- it is now -- i think 38 39 states have bans against
. >> let's bring in our tuesday gaggle. perry bacon jr., solinda lake and john feehery. john, i'll start with you. this is, i assume, you like hearing the words you are hearing from whether it's eric cantor, paul ryan or what we used there with bobby jindal. the question is, how does the republican party turn words into actions of trying to become persuaders? >> i think they have to channel their inner jack kemp. they have to think about, how do we get off the fiscal discipline message, which is really a bob dole message and get into an economic growth message. how do we lift all boats? jack kennedy and jack kemp. that's important for republicans. they can't just talk about how to cut spending. talk about why their policies are going to help people get back to work and get more flexibility in their lives and how it's an impediment to their daily lives. voters understand that but our party is characterized by the fiscal stuff and the social stuff. and there ain't -- they are not able to get beyond that conversation. >> it goes -- solinda, before we started you said, boy, this looks like t
for president in 2016. no question. he will be up against rand paul. we had at the top of the broadcast and i think he is going to be up against the junior senator from florida as well. a handicap now. john kasich might get in there. but marco rubio and chris christied e and rand paul are locks at this point. anything can happen but they want to go. you have to start planning it this is insane if you want to run for president you have to go out three years and raise the money. check out the fox news website which is different bill o'reilly .com. word of the day do not be a
so even john boehner will understand it all. this bill behind me was passed by house republicans in may of 2012. it was designed by wisconsin congressman paul ryan. remember him? and of course it had cuts to programs like food stamps and medicaid instead of military spending. the bill's dead. it died when the 112th congress came to an end. here is another dandy that they say they passed. this was passed as part of john boehner's failed plan b fiscal cliff package. this one is also dead. and so let's recap. the republicans have exactly zero bills in this session, the 113th congress to avoid what we're facing on friday, sequestration. the house needs to introduce a bill before it can go to the senate. but john boehner is too busy saying tough guy words and blaming democrats. i think the secretary of homeland security summed it up best yesterday during a question-and-answer session. >> what impact would sequestration, were it to happen, have on the department? >> you know, i've been in government and public service a long time, 20 years almost. i have never seen anything like this.
on immigration. he placed calls to marco rubio, and john mccain -- >> they are sticking their necks out on this issue. what is frustrating for them, which you saw expressed in some of the things rubio said and paul ryan has said in the last couple of days, if they are going to stick their necks outs, they want to feel they have a partner with the white house. >> joining me right now is democratic congressman eric shifz zer. let's dive in to bring everybody up to speed on where we stand with nine days out on the quester. interesting with the piece out by john boehner, carney has tweeted out, speaker boehner is rewriting history in the op-ed for getting he said i got 98% of what i wanted when he and 173 house rs voted for the sequester. are you surprised by the game of chicken being played in washington, d.c., especially when it comes to the amount of cuts that are coming on march 1st? >> i wish i could say i'm surprised but we've seen enough over the last year and a half not to be surprised by yet another impasse. and i think this is really a lot about damaging members of his congress. t
through a republican primary. maybe they carve up the reasonable vote and rand paul walks through without looking. >> we know that jeb bush won the election in 2008. >> john mccain -- >> he also won, he took a hard line against immigration but was seen as a liberal republican earlier in his year. >> earlier in his career. >> at different points in his career. we tend to believe that moderate republicans can not get through the process but they have shown that it ends up happening. >> do they not get through the process, at the expense of, and look at the last republican primary as the example, by the time mitt romney picked up the nomination after the 112 republican debates that we were judged to. >> and somewhere to the right of herman cain >> i want do not think it's fair to paint taall the republicans with the mitt romney brush. >> the point that was being made is that even if you are not as. right leaning, as some would have you -- some folks may have you to -- some may try to paint you to be. by the time the primary is over, you have really come across -- >> it's true for both partie
too. in some ways that complicates eric cantor's task. paul ryan is his friend. marco rubio, they have ambitions as well. it's hard. whether it's internally or externally thinking about the presidency. >> you make a great historic point about governors. thanks so much. john king reporting. >>> we're just getting in some new information from the nfl about that power outage that disrupted the super bowl for more than half an hour. brian todd is in new orleans. he's working the story. what are you picking up, brian? >> reporter: wolf, just got word from the nfl and from one of the managers of the superdome that there were at least power fluctuations during beyonce's rehearsal in the week leading up to the super bowl. this statements fleeds part, during rehearsals there were some fluctuations in the frequency of the power supply but not in the amount of the power supply to the building. frequency of -- frequency fluctuations can present problems for sensitive technology including high definition television cameras. there were no power outages at the rehearsal. that was from the nfl talking
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)